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Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of St. Basil, the great patriarch of Eastern monasticism found in the catalog.

St. Basil, the great patriarch of Eastern monasticism

IНЎUliiНЎan IНЎA KatriД­

St. Basil, the great patriarch of Eastern monasticism

by IНЎUliiНЎan IНЎA KatriД­

  • 55 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Basilian Fathers Publications in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Basil, Saint, Bishop of Caesarea, ca. 329-379.

  • Edition Notes

    PRIORITY 3.

    Other titlesSaint Basil, the great patriarch of Eastern monasticism
    StatementJulian Katrij ; translated by Demetrius E. Wysochansky.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsIN PROCESS
    The Physical Object
    Pagination60 p. :
    Number of Pages60
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL432327M
    LC Control Number98140199

    During this period a great number of decrees of Synods, ordinances of patriarchs, emperors and abbots, further defined and expanded the rule of St. Basil. Many Eastern synods draw up among their canons laws for monks, often merely enforcing the old rule (e.g. the Synod of Gangres in the middle of the fourth century, Can., xix, etc.). St. St. Basil was Bishop of Caesarea (an area now in eastern Turkey) in the fourth century and is one of the foremost Doctors of the Church who, along with St. Athanasius, is noted as an outstanding defender of Christian orthodoxy during the Arian heresy – a heresy that denied the Divine Nature of .

    St. Basil the Great. St. Basil the Great (), Bishop of Caesarea in the Roman province of Cappadocia, was influential in the development of monasticism in the Eastern Orthodox Church and played a role in the Arian controversy.. One of 10 children, Basil came from a wealthy and noble Christian family of Cappadocia (now in Turkey); his younger brother Gregory, later known as Gregory . St. Basil the Great is one of them. Early Life Basil was born in in the big city of Caesarea (population of about ,), in the region known as Cappadocia, which is located in eastern Asia.

    St. Basil the Elder, father of St. Basil the Great, was the son of a Christian of good birth and his wife, Macrina (Acta SS., January, II), both of whom suffered for the faith during the persecution of Maximinus Galerius (), spending several years of hardship in the wild mountains of Pontus. St. However, they still use St. Basil’s Liturgy on certain feast days: the first five Sundays of Great Lent, the Eves of Nativity and Theophany, on Great and Holy Thursday and Holy Saturday and on the Feast of St. Basil on Jan. 1. The Eastern Churches preserve numerous other prayers attributed to St. Basil, including three Prayers of Exorcism.


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St. Basil, the great patriarch of Eastern monasticism by IНЎUliiНЎan IНЎA KatriД­ Download PDF EPUB FB2

Basil of Caesarea, also called Saint Basil the Great (Greek: Ἅγιος Βασίλειος ὁ Μέγας, Ágios Basíleios o Mégas; Coptic: Ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ Ⲃⲁⲥⲓⲗⲓⲟⲥ; – January 1 or 2, ), was the bishop of Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey).He was an influential theologian who supported the Nicene Creed and opposed the heresies of Born: orCaesarea, Cappadocia.

Basil of Caesarea, also called Saint Basil the Great, was the Greek bishop of Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey). He was an influential theologian who supported the Nicene Creed and opposed the heresies of the early Christian church, fighting against both Arianism and the followers of Apollinaris of Laodicea.5/5(2).

Theology 1 "St. Basil the Great - Patriarch of Eastern Monasticism" - booklet to read as preparation for Theology I. Booklet will be mailed out to incoming freshmen.

Basil's concept of the monastic ideal, socially directed and moderate without being lax, became the fundamental concept of Greek and Slavonic monasticism, and it influenced St. Benedict in legislating for Western monasticism.

The ascetical writings of St. Basil contained in this volume, addressed to both monks and laymen, are of prime importance for understanding the role their author played in the 5/5(1).

This book of homilies, a letter to a bishop, and Q&A penned by St. Basil the Great are still relevant today. The human condition remains the same. Basil uses many metaphors and scripture from the Bible to make his point. Basil the Great or Basil of Caesarea (/) has a kind of special place in my everyday life/5.

A recent book by a well-respected author will assist in this: The I.B. Tauris History of Monasticism:The Eastern Tradition by John Binns (I.B. Tauris, ), pp. Binns is the author of, inter alia, the recent study, The Orthodox Church of Ethiopia as well as Ascetics and Ambassadors of Christ: The Monasteries of Palestine the great patriarch of Eastern monasticism book Basil the Great, one of the three Cappadocian Fathers of the 4th century, definitively shaped monastic community life in the Byzantine Church.

His ascetic writings furnished the theological and instructional foundation St. Basil the “common life” (cenobitism) of monks. The Transept Chapel of St. Basil the Great The south arm of the transept is dedicated to St. Basil the Great, one of the outstanding Fathers of the Church. In the centre of the ceiling of the transept apse Prof.

Bucmaniuk painted an imposing figure of St. Basil in episcopal vestments on a background of rays of the setting sun.

Saint Basil the Great – Father of Eastern Monasticism By Tom Perna on January 2, • (Leave a comment) Today we commemorate one of the Greats of the Church and the Father of Eastern Monasticism – Saint Basil. He is described as “a luminary of the Church” in the Byzantine liturgy texts.

Basil traveled through the East and studied monastic life. As a result, he formed his own monastic group. Gregory joined him. From their discussions, Basil composed a rule of life for monks. He allowed monks and nuns to operate hospitals and guesthouses and work outside the community. His principles still influence Eastern monasticism.

Ines Murzaku of Seton Hall University e-mailed me the other day to say she has a new book coming out next year with Peeters, part of their Eastern Christian Studies series, whose other titles you may read publisher lists it as still in production, so there is no Amazon link yet, but the book is entitled Monastic Tradition in Eastern Christianity and the Outside World: a Call for Dialogue.

What Lasting Service Did St. Basil the Great Do for Monastic Life. As we know, St. Basil was not the ‘creator’ nor the ‘proto-patriarch’ of Eastern monasticism.

Before him there were various attempts and examples of monastic life. His genius and merit, however. Basil the Great Saint Basil the Great (c.

- ) is one of the most important influences on both Byzantine and Western monasticism. Before forming his own monastic community, he visited Egypt, Mesopotamia, Palestine and Syria, observing the monastic life and learning both from the positive and negative examples he encountered.

Basil later became the founder of an important eastern monastic order, the Basilian Order. Basil was a very close friend of St. Gregoryn the Bishop of Nazianzus - Constantinople. Together they wrote an outstanding work, The Philocalia, a collection of articles dealing with Origen (A.D.

), the great Alexandrian theologian. Saint Basil (c. - c. CE), also known as Basil the Great and Basil of Caesarea, was a bishop of Caesarea in central Asia Minor who staunchly defended the church against the 4th-century CE heresy of Arianism.

Basil’s writings on monasticism and theological issues would be hugely influential during his lifetime and in later centuries as the Christian Church developed in the east. sister of St.

Basil the Great who organized convents for women in the East. Hermit monasticism was founded by. Anthony of Egypt. Anthony of Egypt. Almost every Eastern Catholic Cathedral was home to a preacher of the Order of Saint Basil.

Many Basilian monasteries housed miraculous icons of the Blessed Mother. St. Basil’s Guidance on War and Repentance By Fr. John McGuckin St. Basil of Caesarea, also known as St. Basil the Great, was a younger contemporary of Eusebius, and in the following generation of the Church of the late fourth century he emerged as one of the leading theorists of the Christian movement.

Basil was on his way to becoming a famous teacher when he decided to begin a religious life of gospel poverty. After studying various modes of religious life, he founded what was probably the first. The Liturgy of St. Basil is celebrated ten times a year: on the five Sundays in Great Lent, with Vespers on Holy Thursday and Holy Saturday, on the Eves with Vespers (or Feasts themselves, at the normal time, depending on the day of the week) of Christmas and Theophany, and on January 1, which is the feast day of St.

Basil. Ascetical Works St. Basil the Great by Vasilii Blazhennyi (Author), St. Basil (Author), M. Monica Wagner (Translator) His zealous and intrepid defense of the orthodox faith and his contribution to handling the external affairs of the Eastern Church were by no means the whole service to which St.

Basil the Great devoted his considerable talents. St. Basil the Great (), Bishop of Caesarea in the Roman province of Cappadocia, was influential in the development of monasticism in the Eastern Orthodox. He had been successful even in removing the leading proponent of Nicene theology, Athanasius the Great.

One of the few still standing was Basil of Caesarea, a stalwart and vocal defender of Nicene theology, and it just so happened that he was to be leading the liturgical service on the particular Sunday that the emperor came a-calling.Basilian monks are monks who follow the "Rule" of Saint Basil the Great, bishop of Caesarea ().

The chief importance of the monastic rules and institutes of St. Basil lies in the fact that to this day his reconstruction of the monastic life is the basis of most of the monasticism practiced in the Orthodox Churches, as well as some Greek Catholic communities.