Last edited by Mobar
Monday, May 11, 2020 | History

3 edition of economic analysis of level bench systems for forage production in North Dakota found in the catalog.

economic analysis of level bench systems for forage production in North Dakota

Wallace McMartin

economic analysis of level bench systems for forage production in North Dakota

by Wallace McMartin

  • 378 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Economic Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • North Dakota.
    • Subjects:
    • Forage plants -- North Dakota.,
    • Hill farming -- North Dakota.

    • Edition Notes

      Statement[by Wallace McMartin, Howard J. Haas, and Wayne O. Willis.
      SeriesConservation research report no. 14
      ContributionsHaas, Howard J., 1913- joint author., Willis, Wayne O., 1928- joint author., North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station (Fargo)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsS950 .U55 no. 14, SB193 .U55 no. 14
      The Physical Object
      Paginationv, 21 p.
      Number of Pages21
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4066614M
      LC Control Number79606822

      Progressive Forage is the Forage Industry Resource for progressive hay, silage and pasture producers. With contributors including freelance writers, extension specialists and allied industry partners, the leading-edge content is balanced and promotes the best in the forage industry. hay and/or forage-based livestock production. It is critical for managers to understand that there are fundamental differences in managing introduced and native forages. In regions where precipitation levels are higher, introduced species dominate forage-based livestock production systems. Below mm of annual precipitation, however, fewerFile Size: KB.

      Recommended Citation. Ottoson, Howard W., "Economics of forage production and utilization in Dakota and Dixon Counties, Nebraska" (). Retrospective Theses and : Howard W. Ottoson. Often forage quality in a pasture system, especially a rotational system, is a function of management, requiring little additional economic inputs. According to this economic analysis, a producer would be loosing about $ per head if average daily gain were 1 lb/d, break even if average daily gain were lb/day, and make approximately $

      WHEREAS, North Dakota's economic well-being continues to rest heavily on increasing the efficiency and profitability of meat-animal agriculture; and WHEREAS, advanced research techniques necessary to resolve the increasingly complex production problems require state-of-the-art facilities and equipment. Sitzia M, Ruiz FA, in Reference Module in Food Science, Forage System. Forage production is oriented toward the production of forage provision, principally hay from a pure stand of alfalfa or from a mixture of different legumes such as vetch. Cereal production assumes a strategic role in covering sheep feeding requirements. Wheat, barley, oats, triticale and maize are cultivated for.


Share this book
You might also like
Harley-Davidson Man and Machine-1995 Calendar

Harley-Davidson Man and Machine-1995 Calendar

Romance of collecting Case XX knives

Romance of collecting Case XX knives

Chemistry-A Molecular Science (Solutions Manuel) [STUDENT EDITION]

Chemistry-A Molecular Science (Solutions Manuel) [STUDENT EDITION]

The mob cap, or, Loves disguises

The mob cap, or, Loves disguises

Vicki!

Vicki!

Planning for locational change in the delivery of medical care

Planning for locational change in the delivery of medical care

agricultural situation in the Soviet Union

agricultural situation in the Soviet Union

The Twentieth Maine

The Twentieth Maine

Equity, diversity, and Canadian labour

Equity, diversity, and Canadian labour

Mission or maintenance

Mission or maintenance

Between them

Between them

Vocabulary building, word study and bibliography.

Vocabulary building, word study and bibliography.

Economic analysis of level bench systems for forage production in North Dakota by Wallace McMartin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. An economic analysis of level bench systems for forage production in North Dakota. [Wallace McMartin; H J Haas; Wayne O Willis; North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station (Fargo); United States.

Agricultural Research Service.]. An economic analysis of level bench systems for forage production in North Dakota. By Wallace. McMartin, Howard J. Haas, Wayne O. Willis and North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station (Fargo) Abstract.

no.1 Topics: Forage plants, Irrigation. Publisher: [Washington. An economic analysis of level bench systems for forage production in North Dakota.

By Wallace. McMartin, Howard J. Haas, Wayne O. Willis and North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station (Fargo) Topics: Forage plants, Irrigation Author: Wallace. McMartin, Howard J. Haas, Wayne O. Willis. North Dakota (Fig. In south central North Dakota, level benches increased water storage and doubled alfalfa (Me&ago saliva) and smooth brome- grass yields as compared with those on adjacent sloping lands (Haas et al.

; Haas and Willis). McMartin (a) stated that using level benches would be economical forCited by: 1. One reason that soil conserving adjustments in land use have not been made by farmers is that considerable uncertainty surrounds the economics of soil erosion control on the farm level.

This study is an attempt to increase knowledge and reduce some of the uncertainty with regard to the economics of erosion control in a specific : Howard W.

Ottoson. Estimating Forage Production, Monitoring, and Evaluating the Grazing system DIRECT METHODS Converting hay yield to pasture yield Harvesting and weighing hay from the entire paddock is the best measure of forage production.

You can use this method to roughly estimate the amount of annual forage production. IMPROVING FORAGE PRODUCTION AND QUALITY IN NORTH DAKOTA. Fall harvesting of alfalfa has economic advantage in North Dakota.

[CD-ROM computer file]. Crop Science Society of America, Madison, WI. Meyer, D.W. Don't forget phosphorus for alfalfa production. which caused the forage yield of 4-cut system to be tons/A less. [P.D.F] The New Wild West: Black Gold, Fracking, and Life in a North Dakota Boomtown [P.D.F].

Technologies, tools and methodologies for forage evaluation in grasslands and rangelands Jay P. Angerer Texas A&M University System, Blackland Research and Extension Center, E.

Blackland Road, Temple, TXUSA Email: [email protected] INTrOdUCTIONFile Size: KB. *Report no longer being created/updated by North Dakota Oil and Gas Division. Cumulative Oil and Gas Production: Cumulative oil production totals by formation; Drilling: Drilling Rigs currently active in North Dakota: Historical drilling statistics; Additional Data/Charts: Chart of daily oil production.

Alfredo Aponte, a Ph.D. student from Puerto Rico is conducting research to determine advanced cropping systems for forage and biofuel production in North Dakota. My team works on close collaboration with Dr. Burton Johnson, Plant Sciences, on the development of double-cropping systems including oilseeds/biomass crops.

North Dakota Agriculture and Industry. North Dakota's real gross state product in was estimated to be $38, which was $, and 79% lower than the national state average, $, North Dakota has the 47th highest GSP out of the 50 states.

North Dakota is the most rural of all the states, with farms covering more than 90% of the land. Forage quality of oat hay varieties.

Oat hay Barley Hays. Fargo. Carrington Annual Forage Crops. Forage Wheat Variety Trial Report. Forage Rye Variety Trial Report. Warm-season and Cool-season Cool-season and Forage Brassicas variety trial Sweet Sorghum variety trial Sorghum variety. Here are the latest Forages Variety Trial Results from around North Dakota Trial Results - Forages - Winter Rye - Carrington Trial Results - Forage - Winter Triticale - Carrington.

The purpose of this report is to assess the role of agriculture in the North Dakota economy. This analysis is both statewide and regional in perspective (Figure 1). Economic changes occurring within the state vary from region to region, and the state’s regions File Size: KB.

An Economic View to Forage and Fodder Production in Eastern India 1, 2 and Abhay Kumar 3 The mixed crop–livestock systems of India are underpinned by the c rop residues which. U.S. forage statistics more t thousand t to 15, thousand tons 5, to 10, thousand tons 2, to 5, thousand tons 0 to 2, thousand tons Total forage production Total forage production is represented by the total of alfalfa, other hay, silage and greenchop production.

national forage review. Broccoli production in forage soybean and foxtail millet cover crop mulches. HortSci. 2 Abdul-Baki, A. and J. Teasdale. Sweetclover production and management.

North Dakota Extension Service Publication R Fargo, N. An Economic Analysis of Cover Crop Use in Georgia to Protect Groundwater Quality. North Dakota † Survey Data from Quick Stats as of: May/29/ Crops - Planted, Harvested, Yield, Production, Price Click here for North Dakota Census of Agriculture State and County Profiles featuring land, sales, and demographic highlights and much more.

requirements for maintenance and production. Natural pasture is a forage but is not grown as a crop, so is termed forage, not a forage crop. Forage crops produce much higher yields than natural forages and because they produce high yields, can be fed to cattle as both green forage during the rains and conserved for the long dry season.

by: 6. Economic use of grain and forage in livestock production (Circular / South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station) [Johnson, Canute M] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Economic use of grain and forage in livestock production (Circular / South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station)Author: Canute M Johnson.Ten Leading States and North Dakota’s Rank Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 U.S.

Rank % of US Total Crop Production - 6 Barley. ID MT ND CO WY WA MN CA PA MD 3   Diversification and ecosystem services for conservation agriculture: Outcomes from pastures and integrated crop–livestock systems - Volume 28 Issue 2 - Matt A.

Sanderson, David Archer, John Hendrickson, Scott Kronberg, Mark Liebig, Kris Nichols, Marty Cited by: